The following information applies only to investors who own Natixis Funds directly. You are a Direct Shareholder if you receive statements from Natixis Funds. If you own a Natixis fund through a brokerage firm, we encourage you to contact them to determine what their policies are.

In late January, Forms 1099-DIV, 1099-B, 1099-R and 1099-Q are mailed to shareholders of all funds except AEW Real Estate Fund and Loomis Sayles Multi-Asset Income Fund. Forms for these two funds are mailed at the end of February.

 

Tax information you should expect and when you should expect itWhat it's used for 
December 31 year-end statement
Mailed in early January
Summarizes all your Natixis Funds account activity for the calendar year.¹
Combined Form 1099-DIV
Mailed in late January
Form 1099-DIV reports taxable fund dividend and capital gains distributions. If your taxable distribution from any Natixis Fund was less than $10, it will not be reported on your Form 1099-DIV. However, you are responsible for including the sum in your tax calculations. If your fund(s) did not pay dividends/capital gains, you will not receive a Form 1099-DIV.
Combined Form 1099-B
Mailed in late February for Natixis Diversified Income Fund and AEW Real Estate Fund only
We report cost basis to both you and the IRS this year on your Form 1099-B. The form is separated into sections. These sections are based on whether the shares you sold were held long- or short-term and whether or not we are reporting the cost basis information to the IRS. What this means is that when you sell shares, the redemption could be separated into multiple sections on the 1099-B depending on the age of the shares that were sold.
Form 1099-R
Mailed in late January
Reports full and partial distributions from IRA, Keogh, or 403(b) plans.
Form 1099-Q
Mailed in late January
Reports distributions of earnings from a qualified tuition program, such as a Coverdell Education Savings Account (ESA).
Form 5498-ESA
Mailed in late April
Reports contributions to Coverdell Educational Savings Accounts (CESA).
Form 5498
Mailed in late May
Reports contributions to IRA accounts
Form 8937
Within 45 days of the organizational action
Issuers of corporate securities are required to complete Internal Revenue Service Form 8937 to report organizational actions, including nontaxable distributions that affect the basis of the securities involved in the organizational action.

Form 8937
Loomis Sayles Limited Term Government and Agency Fund (ROC - 11/15/13)

Form 8937
Loomis Sayles Inflation Protected Securities Fund (ROC - 11/15/16)

 

¹ You should not rely on distribution figures on your year-end statements to report your income taxes; it is not unusual for adjustments to occur after December 31. In early February, you can visit Account Access to view any distributions that may have been paid on your funds and to view information included on your tax forms.

Other resources
Users of TurboTax or H&R Block software can download their Natixis Funds information as part of the tax preparation process on these third-party sites.

The IRS website is another good resource.

This is not intended as tax advice. Make sure to consult a tax professional with any tax-related questions.


Cost Basis Information

Cost basis information for Natixis Funds shareholders
As part of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, we began providing cost basis information to you and the IRS on mutual fund shares purchased and sold after January 1, 2012.

How this affects your account
Shares purchased prior to January 1, 2012 are referred to by the IRS as "non-covered shares".
These non-covered shares will be reported on your Form 1099-B, but we are not required to provide their cost basis information to the IRS.

Shares purchased after January 1, 2012 are referred to by the IRS as "covered shares."
These covered shares will be reflected on your Form 1099-B and we will report their cost basis to the IRS. For more information on this, and the different methods available, please call us at 800-225-5478 or go to 1costbasissolution.com. The IRS web site is also a good resource at irs.gov.

We will report cost basis information to both you and the IRS (for covered shares only) on the Form 1099-B that you will receive in February. The form is separated into sections. These sections are based on whether the shares you sold were held long- or short-term and whether or not we are reporting the cost basis information to the IRS.

These are the sections that may be displayed on your 1099-B. You will only see the sections that apply to your shares.

  • Short-term transactions for which cost basis is being reported to the IRS.
  • Short-term transactions for which cost basis is not being reported to the IRS.
  • Long-term transactions for which cost basis is being reported to the IRS.
  • Long-term transactions for which cost basis is not being reported to the IRS.
  • Transactions for which basis is not being reported to the IRS because a short or long-term determination is unknown.
What this means is that when you sell shares, a single redemption could be separated into multiple sections on the 1099-B depending on the age of the shares that were sold, and whether or not we report cost basis to the IRS.


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